Not a Netflix Pick: NOBODY WALKS

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My respect for the very talented and very funny Lena Dunham has turned a little sour after watching Nobody Walks, a film she penned about a young, struggling filmmaker, Martine, (Olivia Thirlby) who seeks the help of a middle-aged sound technician, Peter, (John Krasinski) to complete her project.

In typical Dunham fashion, she makes all the female characters into hardcore feminist figures, exposing their sexuality to their male counterparts with no intention of making a meaningful connection.

Martine comes from New York stay at the West Coast home of Peter and Julie (Rosemarie DeWitt) to work on her film. Julie, a semi-famed feminist and psychologist, has an interesting relationship with one of her patients, in that he has an unquenched attraction towards her. Similarly, her teenage daughter, Kolt, leads on three separate men in a sort of coming-of-age side story.

To be quite honest, I’m not sure how any of the characters truly change in this film. If anything, Peter and Julie’s marriage is damaged and Martine’s film is left unfinished.

What I do like about this film, which can be found on Netflix, is the cinematography and the attention to sound that it gives. Seeing as the central plot is about creating sound for Martine’s film, it was an interesting, almost introspective spin on this Sundance nominated movie.

If you, too, are a fan of Dunham and her HBO show Girls, I would suggest you check out Tiny Furniture, an oddly hysterical story of a college grad who tries to make something of her life. This, too, can be found on Netflix.

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6 thoughts on “Not a Netflix Pick: NOBODY WALKS

  1. “In typical Dunham fashion, she makes all the female characters into hardcore feminist figures, exposing their sexuality to their male counterparts with no intention of making a meaningful connection.”

    See, I don’t consider that feminist, but I know that a lot of fans of Dunham/Girls feel that it is.

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    • I knew someone would take issue with this statement. What I was trying to get at here is that a key part of feminism is to establish a woman’s sexual side of herself as separate from the rest of her (basically that a woman does not have to use sex primarily to procreate, as past thinkers would argue). That is exactly how Dunham created her female characters – Martine in particular.

      Hope this clears it up. Thanks for reading and commenting!

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  2. Pingback: CRITICS’ CHOICE TELEVISION AWARDS 2013 | The Looking Glass | Hey Sweetheart, Get Me Rewrite!

  3. Nice review Rob. This movie could have sizzled like a freakin’ pan with all of the sexual tension going on, but it just sort of kept it too subtle and slow. Weird, and something I didn’t expect.

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    • Thanks for stopping by! Coming into the film, I had no clue what to expect – I just searched “Lena Dunham” on Netflix and that popped up. And I agree on the sexual tension being way too slow for the film (and way too abundant – every character was sexually charged one way or another).

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