Why I Still Go to the Movies

In the never-ending debate between film and television, there’s no question in my mind that the third season of Lost blows any movie out of the water (pun intended). But in the Netflix era we live in, its so easy to become distracted with the rest of your life scattered around your bedroom. When you press the “Play Next” button, you realize you need to use the bathroom. You sit back down. Then you’re suddenly thirsty, so you get up and get a glass of water. You sit back down. Then an iMessage pops up on your computer screen, and of course you have to answer it right away. This turns into a ten minute conversation about when you and your friend are going to go to Chipotle. You “x” out of your chat window and notice an email from your professor. You have an assignment due in an hour. The episode of that show you really love is already halfway over, you’ve only caught a glimpse of the plot arc, none of the B story, and you feel defeated.

At the movies, you leave your life. Sure, some people bring their phones or their friends who bring their phones, but I don’t. I sit on the plush throne, popcorn in hand, and pray that nobody kicks the back of my seat. When the lights dim and the previews start, your life goes away. That big project that’s due soon washes away. That fight you’re in with your friend is muted. Everything that mattered doesn’t anymore.

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The other night, I went to go see The Skeleton Twins starring SNL veterans Bill Hader and Kristin Wiig as twins who reunite after Milo (Hader) tries to kill himself. By no right is this the full-blown comedy one would expect from this pairing, but instead it was a dark, tender look at life when it doesn’t go the way you planned. Don’t get me wrong, there are some pee-your-pants funny moments going on, especially by Luke Wilson, who plays Lance, Maggie’s (Wiig) fiancé. Go for the lip sync to “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now,” stay for the unmatched dynamic of Hader and Wiig.

Netflix Pick: ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT

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After more than a month of fighting the urge to binge on the fourth and final season of Netflix’s “semi-original” series, I finally finished all fifteen new episodes of Arrested Development.

From mastermind Mitchell Hurwitz comes the final installment of the Bluth family saga, set five years after the show was “abruptly cancelled” by Fox, after winning multiple Emmy’s, including Outstanding Comedy Series in 2004.

Each of the fifteen episodes in this season follows a specific character, as Ron Howard notes in the opening credits, “It’s (insert character’s name)’s Arrested Development.”

Because this season spans five years and follows the separate journeys of all nine Bluths (and Fünkes) to their ultimate meeting point at the “Cinco de Cuatro” festival, it takes a few episodes to kick into the fast-paced gear that veteran Arrested Development fans are used to.

While Hurwitz brings back fan favorites like Lucille (II) Austero (Liza Minnelli), Berry Zuckerkorn (Henry Winkler), Ann Veal (Mae Whitman), and Kitty Sanchez (Judy Greer), he also added some scene-stealers in this new season. Kristin Wiig and Seth Rogen joined the cast as Young Lucille and Young George Sr. in this season’s many flashbacks. John Slattery (Mad Men) and Mary Lynn Rajskub (24) are hysterical as Doctor Norman and his spiritual partner, Heartfire, a mute whose thoughts float across the screen.

Likewise, the writers were able to incorporate the many recurring jokes from the original series, like “I’ve made a huge mistake,” “I’m afraid I blue myself,” and, my favorite, “…her?” While I was glad the writers continued with these jokes, it was clear that the new season did not use the first three as a crutch to get pity laughs.

Looking forward, both Hurwitz and Ron Howard have alluded to a possible Arrested Development film in the coming years. In the meantime, I’ll be reevaluating my life to the tune of “Sound of Silence.”