Summer Lovin’

As the title of this post suggests, I have found love this summer. A newfound love of summer television. And I’m not just talking about summer’s #1 show – America’s Got Talent (which I non-ironically watch and non-ironically tweet about).

This summer has been a gem for television, between Netflix’s Orange is the New Black and HBO’s The Leftovers, AMC’s Halt and Catch Fire and FX’s TyrantFox’s 24: Live Another Day and the highly anticipated Netflix revival of The Killing, love is in the air(waves). Puns.

My hope is to blog about these shows before the summer is over, but, alas, my 9-5 internship can kind of put a damper on my blogging spirit, as it is so much easier to binge my DVR than it is to pause and reflect on each individual episode.

Side thought: Merritt Wever in the Nurse Jackie finale was amazing. Pulling for her to take home a second Emmy.

Side thought to the side thought: Emmy nominations will be announced on Thursday. I will surely post my thoughts on my reaction and picks for the awards (which will be held on a Monday in August because NBC doesn’t respect television…if the Oscars were held on a Monday in March, the world would go apeshit).

Be blogging soon,

Rob

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Mireille Enos and My On-Again, Off-Again Relationship with THE KILLING

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After Mireille Enos’ very convincing performance in the box office smash-hit World War Z, my on-again, off-again relationship with The Killing is back in full swing.

Although Enos’ role as Karin Lane, wife to U.N. globetrotter Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt), allots her little face time, her ability to steal the early scenes of the apocalypse is uncanny.

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Much like her character Sarah Linden in The Killing, Karin appears to be a sheepish soccer mom of two, but she’s equipped with quite the roundhouse kick when the world falls to pieces.

The second season of the AMC crime drama is a continuation of season one’s Rosie Larson case, and the pieces are slowly, but surely, falling into place. Most critics wrote the show off in its second season, after becoming entranced with the surreal vibes from the first season. For this reason, there was a long hiatus to ultimately produced the show’s third season, currently airing Sunday nights on AMC – a nice liaison between the end of Mad Men and the beginning of Breaking Bad‘s final, eight episode stretch.

However, I like the “Big Brother” feeling that surrounds the second season of The Killing. By turning Linden against the police department and practically writing off Mitch Larson, the show is able to better delve into the Linden/Holder relationship and explore Sarah’s troubled past with Reggie and her various foster families.

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The female detective is becoming an increasingly prominent role in television these days. From Claire Danes in Homeland to Elisabeth Moss in Top of the Lake to Sarah Paulson in American Horror Story: Asylum (shown above, left to right), these women all share a similar troubled past and an extreme work ethic, which leaves them almost void of emotion. However, I feel as though Enos most powerfully conveys her detachment from herself and her family as the Rosie Larsen case comes to consume her and her son’s life.

Funny enough, the three women above are likely to each take home an Emmy in their respective categories – Danes for Actress in a Drama Series, Moss for Actress in a Movie or Mini-Series, and Paulson for Supporting Actress in a Movie or Mini-Series. Poor Enos. Maybe the writers should make Sarah develop a psychiatric disorder to get the voters’ attention!

Flashback: Shows I’ve Dropped

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Once Upon a Time: From Adam Horowitz comes this reimagining of our favorite storybook characters, conveniently living in the isolated town of Storybrooke, Maine. While I enjoyed its first season and its writers many allusions to their previous work on Lost (the clock being stuck at 8:15, the Apollo candy bars, etc.), the second season was a runaway train from the get-go. The writers added too many characters to a show – and since they decided to combine the fairy tale realm with all literature in general, their options were seemingly limitless. I did, however, like the introduction of Captain Hook, who brought a nice spin on the infamous character. However, by writing characters like Mulan and Lancelot into the plot, the writers overstepped their “fairy tale” boundaries. In the last episode I saw, ABC decided to give Jorge Garcia, a Lost alumnus, another job as the Giant. The special effects were just too ridiculous and I finally came to realize how bad of an actress Jennifer Morrison is on this show – her talents were much more appreciated on House, M.D.. From what I’ve heard, the show had a great season second season finale because of another mind-bending cliffhanger, but I don’t think I have it in me to watch twelve more episodes of uncomfortable mother/daughter moments between Snow White and her same-age daughter, Emma.

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Bates Motel: In my opinion, this show has the greatest ratio of most hype to biggest flop that I’ve ever experienced as a television viewer. Promotions for this Psycho prequel were everywhere – in newspapers, on billboards, and even in movie theaters. Where show runner Carlton Cuse, another former Lost writer, went wrong was making this prequel modern. When you think about the original Alfred Hitchcock film, the majority of the fear generated from the film comes from its grainy, black and white lens and its haunting soundtrack. The A&E show has neither. While Vera Farmiga plays the part of Norma perfectly, Freddie Highmore lacks the necessary acting abilities to compare to his counterpart, Anthony Perkins. At least he isn’t becoming one of those reckless child stars, like his contemporary Amanda Bynes.

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Da Vinci’s Demons: I think I made it through two and half episodes of Starz’ newest period drama before realizing I didn’t care for any of the characters, whatsoever. Where this show went wrong was trying to make a mountain out of a molehill. On any given day, you can find a special on the Renaissance or da Vinci somewhere in your local listings, but this show tried to over fictionalize the prominent historical figure to the point that he just could not have done all the things he does (i.e. two-handed swordfights while solving an age-old mystery…while intoxicated). Also, if I had a nickel for every time Leonardo got high in the two and a half episodes I saw, I would be able to buy many packs of gum…like, many packs.

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The Killing: Although I made this my Netflix Pick last week, I just finished the first season this morning and I do not feel confident in my ability to see the second season through. I am getting sick of the pointless red herrings and even sicker of the Larson family crying about their dead daughter. Again, I get where the show is trying to go with showing a side of a murder that most shows ignore, but it’s a bit much after seeing Mitch cry every five seconds. Also, I cannot comprehend why the badass Linden would even want to marry her fiancé in Sonoma. He’s a total sketch ball (and I thought he was going to be Rosie’s killer). On that note, I don’t even know if I know who the killer is or not. I mean, I think we’ve all established that the Councilman did it – he did use the screen name Orpheus after all – but the final scenes of the finale make you wonder if it was him or not. I did not sign up for “Who Killed Rosie Larson? A Two Season Saga,” I thought it was one and done. Now, I guess, critics are raving about the third season, as Linden and Holder get assigned to a new case. Maybe I’ll just pick up from this season so I can get rid of the Larson family once and for all.

Have you dropped any shows? Comment below on which one and why! Maybe you can even make a joke out of it – your call.

Netflix Pick: THE KILLING

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Recently, I’ve started to watch AMC’s critically acclaimed series, The Killing, which hopes to answer the question, “Who Killed Rosie Larsen?” Although I’m only five episodes deep, I have some strong feelings (both good and bad) about this drama.

Set in the dismal wasteland that is Seattle, WA, the show revolves around three intertwined stories – the police investigation, the Larsen family, and the Darren Richmond campaign for mayor. While I give the show credit for trying to give equal time to each of the three stories, I really only care about the police investigation.

The about-to-retire Agent Sarah Linden (Emmy nominee Mireille Enos) and her soon-to-be-replacement Stephen Holder (Joel Kinnaman) track down lead after lead to find who killed Rosie Larsen. Their relationship defies all previous cop partnerships, straying away from the clichéd “good cop, bad cop” mantra.

Linden, who is engaged to be married in sunny Sonoma, keeps delaying her departure to California to be with her fiancé, which gives her son some more time to spend in his beloved harbor. Her stone cold demeanor and judgmental eyebrow raises cover up her broken interior – which has been alluded to but not yet explained. Holder, on the other hand, is a goof. Never speaking with grammatical accuracy and dressing like a thug, nobody seems to appreciate his contributions to the investigation.

All the while, we get glimpses into the Larsen’s household and Darren Richmond’s campaign for mayor, neither of which I care about.

The Larsen’s have mourned for five straight episodes. I understand that the loss of their daughter must be tragic and induce perpetual grief, but after one bed-wetting and another uncontrollable crying fit, I’ve seen enough.

Similarly, Richmond’s mayoral campaign is very cyclical. So far, the only connection Richmond has to Rosie’s murder is that her body was found in the trunk of one of his company cars, which had been reported stolen days before the killing. However, his plot is centered on finding a mole in his office, which I, again, don’t care about.

Regardless, I continue to click “Play Next Episode.” Someone should look into Netflix addiction, because I think it’s a thing… but that’s a conversation for another day.

The Killing returns to AMC for its third season June 2, joining Mad Men to make an all-star Sunday line-up.